Roy Sievers, RIP: Sentimental journeys

Roy Sievers (right) with Mickey Mantle.

Roy Sievers (right) with Mickey Mantle.

Roy Sievers modeled his batting stroke on that of Joe Medwick, his baseball hero growing up in St. Louis. He made a respectable career as a slugging first baseman and a smooth swinger who studied the game and didn’t let the seedier sides of it soil his shyly genial nature.

Sievers, the first to win an American League Rookie of the Year award when it became an each-league prize (in 1949), died 3 April at 90. He’d overcome early career shoulder miseries to convert from the outfield to first base at the impetus of Bill Veeck, who owned the St. Louis Browns with whom Sievers first arose.

Ninety years ago, Senators conquered the field

Joe Judge (right) sliding into third base in Game Seven, 1924 World Series---he'd be stranded and the game went to extra innings and mythology . . .

Joe Judge (right) sliding into third base in Game Seven, 1924 World Series—he’d be stranded and the game went to extra innings and mythology . . .

So you think the Kansas City Royals won a wild card game the weird way? How about a team winning a World Series by way of a Hall of Fame starting pitcher throwing four shutout relief innings into the extra innings and the Series-winning run scoring when an infield grounder took a high bad hop over a third baseman’s head?

Ben Chapman, Once and for All

The look on Chapman's face (right) says it all---he hoped posing for this and several shots with Jackie Robinson would save his job managing the Phillies.

Ben Chapman’s (right) look says it all—he hoped posing for this and several shots with Jackie Robinson during the 1947 season would save his job managing the Phillies.

Jackie Robinson suffered few baitings more vicious than those led by Ben Chapman, the former outfielder who managed the Philadelphia Phillies, when Robinson broke into the Show with the 1947 Brooklyn Dodgers. And, yes, it really did get to a point where Chapman’s job was on the line, and he posed for photographs with Robinson—clearly ill at ease—in a bid to turn down the heat he had brought himself and his team.

Eddie Yost, RIP: The Walking Man’s Time

Eddie Yost, stroll master . . .

The Walking Man has walked home at 86.

Eddie Yost as a player could hit a little bit, sometimes with power, usually early in the order, but had one of the most remarkable facilities for wringing first base on the house out of opposing pitchers. At his death Tuesday he sat number eleven on the all-time pass list, having led his league in walks six times, and having averaged 124 walks per 162 games in his eighteen-season playing career.

Not Quite, Bobby V . . .

He’s no September historian, either . . .

Bobby Valentine’s bicycle seems to spend more time backpedaling than anything else when he’s aboard. And he has no better sense of direction than when he’s trying to pedal forward.

A few days ago, when a reporter had the audacity to ask in which if any areas the Red Sox needed improvement, Valentine delivered yet another remark the kind that has Red Sox Nation and Red Sox critics alike wondering when, not if, Valentine gets pinked. Not because he’s wrong, necessarily, but because he has a need, apparently insatiable, to take the low road, implying he can do nothing much past playing what he’s been dealt.