Noah’s bark should have gotten a Mets bite

Syndergaard, escorted from Sunday's game by trainer Ray Ramirez.

Syndergaard, escorted from Sunday’s game by trainer Ray Ramirez.

It’s one thing for baseball players to have the kind of contract negotiating autonomy they’ve enjoyed in the free agency era. But it’s something else when the keys to the zoo get lifted by the animals, as the Mets may be learning the hard way. Players may choose for whom they play when contracts expire, but they still, alas, have bosses. Or so we thought.

Don’t be surprised if the 23-5 terrorist attacks the Nationals laid upon the Mets Sunday afternoon have a lot of people wondering just who’s been running the Mets.

A nasty hiccup in the Harvey plan shaken off, somewhat

So the Mets regrouped and whacked the Braves 4-0 Monday night. With the Nationals’ interleague set against the Orioles postponed, it pushed the Mets’ magic number to clinch the National League East to seven. Will it be enough to erase the sour taste of Sunday?

That was when manager Terry Collins went with the prudent course the Mets chose with and for Matt Harvey. Lifted him Sunday after five innings, seventy-seven pitches, one hit, and a 1-0 lead against the Yankees, with whom the Mets had split the weekend set coming in.

Santana, down for the count, maybe the career

"We have guys that can step up and get the job done on the field. That’s not the concern. For me, what the concern is: I feel for Johan. You do something for so long, you are so successful at it, to have a setback like this, it hits everyone hard."---David Wright (right), on Johan Santana (left)

We have guys that can step up and get the job done on the field. That’s not the concern. For me, what the concern is: I feel for Johan. You do something for so long, you are so successful at it, to have a setback like this, it hits everyone hard.—David Wright (right), on Johan Santana (left)

Some people thought New York Mets manager Terry Collins was somewhere between nuts and flakes to let Johan Santana try to finish what turned out to be the first no-hitter in club history last June. Wasn’t Santana on the comeback trail after missing nineteen months including all of the 2011 season recuperating from surgery to repair a torn left shoulder anterior capsule.

Earl Weaver, RIP: Old School, Next School

“Earl,” Hall of Fame pitcher Jim Palmer, who should know as well as anyone, tells ESPN,  ”was a black and white manager. He kind of told you what your job description was going to be and kind of basically told you if you wanted to play on the Orioles, this was what you needed to do. And if you couldn’t do it, I’ll get someone else. I know that’s kind of tough love, but I don’t think anyone other than Marianna, his wife, would describe Earl as a warm and fuzzy guy.”

This is the way you throw out the first manager, you miserable pudknockers!!!

“This is the way you throw out the first manager, you miserable pudknockers!!!”

Hasta la Vista, Jose . . .

Before you arrange the necktie parties for the parties involved, let’s make one thing absolutely incontrovertible: When all was said, and too much was done or undone, depending upon your point of view, the New York Mets had little enough choice but to think about letting Jose Reyes go. Especially if they weren’t going to quit kidding themselves and swap him at the midsummer nonwaiver trade deadline for something better than a third-round draft pick at best.

The Mets Look Smarter Than They've Looked for Several Years

Now that Met fans can speak of him retrospectively, wisdom should inform one and all of them that Carlos Beltran was, when healthy, one of the better lights among Met clubs that so often disillusioned from high expectations. And, yes, it’s time to quit blaming him for the onset of one of the Mets’ more heartbreak-shepherding eras.

File this under your Mets Keeping It Real tab: If he’d swung and missed on Adam Wainwright’s breaker in 2006, the screaming would have been variations on the theme of what the hell were you swinging at?!? When you’re fated to be the final out of a lost pennant, you can’t win for losing. Especially after your tenure from there is pockmarked by injuries that often made people forget how productive you were (and are) when healthy.