HOF Vote: On the BBWAA plantation, privilege is in the eye of the beholder

Dan Le Batard, sent to bed without his supper for saying Big Daddy's been foolish . . .

Dan Le Batard, sent to bed without his supper for saying Big Daddy’s been foolish . . .

I can admit when I’m wrong. I thought the Hall of Fame-voting writer who turned his ballot over to Deadspin, vowing to cast his ballot according to how Deadspin readers voted, might have opened the proverbial can of worms. A can at least as putrid as that which surrounds the farce of most years’ All-Star Game voting, where fans can vote multiple times and often use the game for the Hall of Fame’s purpose, a kind of lifetime achievement award even if the players for whom they vote are not having All-Star worthy seasons.

Winter’s green . . .

Baseball’s offseason is many things, and dull is rarely one of them, but this offseason’s winter meetings among the major league organisations could have been smothered by the activity that preceded it. Could have been—particularly in light of the Yankees’ doings in signing Brian McCann and Jacoby Ellsbury while letting Robinson Cano chase the dollars they weren’t quite willing to show—but weren’t. There are various takes floating about regarding the doings and undoings; here, for whatever they’re worth, are mine:

La Russa, Torre, Cox . . .

La Russa, Torre, Cox . . .

The brilliant Bisher bunted one foul, once upon a time

Furman Bisher, who will join the writers enshrined in Cooperstown in due course . . . (Atlanta Journal-Constitution.)

Furman Bisher, who will join the writers enshrined in Cooperstown in due course . . . (Atlanta Journal-Constitution.)

Furman Bisher was one of the writers beaten out by Roger Angell for the next J.G. Taylor Spink Award. The late Atlanta Journal-Constitution columnist has received his defense from colleague and friend Jeff Schultz. And while you can hardly fault Schultz for standing by his man, there are little perspectives to be considered.

Cooperstown has a date with an Angell

Roger Angell, baseball's prose poet---who doesn't like that term.

Roger Angell, baseball’s prose poet—who doesn’t like that term.

Roger Angell at 93 still reports to The New Yorker every day to read fiction for the magazine and, here and there, write yet another one of his symphonic essays from the diamonds and the stands. Next summer, he’s going to make a trip to Cooperstown as an honoured guest.