Is Gil Hodges really shy of being a Hall of Famer?

Gil Hodges in the Ebbets Field batting cage . . .

Gil Hodges in the Ebbets Field batting cage . . .

How beloved and respected was Gil Hodges during his playing career? Enough that when he sank into a ferocious batting slump crossing the end of the 1952 season and the beginning of the 1953 season, the entire borough of Brooklyn, if not all New York City, took up prayers for him. A devout Roman Catholic, Hodges was genuinely touched that even non-Catholic churches joined the prayer chain.

Modern Era HOF Ballot: Surgery, guile not enough for Tommy John

Tommy John, en route a longer pitching life after the surgery that bears his name than he had before it . . .

Tommy John, en route a slightly longer pitching life after the surgery that bears his name than he had before it . . .

There’s a new line of underwear out there called Tommy John. Unfortunately for baseball fans, it isn’t the creation of the former pitcher, which is kind of a shame. There go your opportunities for beefing up John’s Hall of Fame case by observing, “Jim Palmer only posed in his underwear; Tommy John up and created his.”

Too much, too soon, too late: The strange case of Steve Garvey

Steve Garvey, young perfectionist.

Steve Garvey, too perfectionist for his own good.

Long before he became a baseball player whose perfectionism on the field or in his person gave him something of a reputation as a phony, Steve Garvey was given too much, too soon. Not accolades but responsibilities.

He was an only child who was forced by two working parents to come home from school and clean house, get dinner on the stove, and look out for his invalid grandmother (partially paralyzed in a freak accident), even having to help her go to the bathroom regularly.

Darvish owns Game Seven, but he wasn’t the only Dodger culprit

The look on Darvish's face after Series MVP Springer took him over the fence said only too much . . .

The look on Darvish’s face after Series MVP Springer’s drive landed over the left center field fence said only too much . . .

Give Yu Darvish credit. He owned this one and didn’t flinch. He went out to start Game Seven of the World Series, got torn apart in an inning and two thirds, and felt even worse for letting down the team he appreciated for giving him another postseason shot in the first place.

Especially because his previous Series start, in Game Three, went the same way, only with one less run against him.

Springing to World Series rings

George Springer (right), celebrating after his two-run homer finished the Astros' scoring for Game Seven . . .

George Springer (right), celebrating after his two-run homer finished the Astros’ scoring for Game Seven . . .

When you’re a 56-year-old baseball team blasted inside out in grief for your hurricane-battered home city, and you feel there’s too little you can do to remove your city’s suffering, there’s really only one thing you can do. You can go out and play baseball and give your city a lift that can’t be paid for.

So we’ll see you for Game Seven . . .

Verlander, undone not by his own pitching but by lack of support while the Dodgers ground two runs out of him and performed escape acts on the field . . .

Verlander, undone not by his own pitching but by lack of support while the Dodgers ground two runs out of him and performed escape acts on the field . . .

The good news: This World Series gets to a Game Seven, after all, for the second straight season and the third in four seasons. Depending on your point of view, the bad news: As this Series has gone, Game Six was just a little too full of something resembling normalcy.

With this Series mostly playing like The Twilight Monty Elsewhere, there was just something wrong with getting a mere Mike & Molly Tuesday night. Game Six was pleasant. Amusing. Sometimes revealing. That about exhausts it.

Monty Python’s Flying Series

Alex Bregman (lower left), mobbed after walking it off . . .

Alex Bregman (lower left), mobbed after walking it off . . .

Forget any previous comparisons to The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, and St. Elsewhere. This is Monty Python’s Flying Series. On Sunday night it was as though the Dodgers and Astros agreed before the first pitch, “And now, for something completely different . . . ” As if this World Series wasn’t, already.

This Game Five may not be the greatest World Series game ever played, but it was for damn sure the most entertaining. So much so that you might even find Astro fans who were sorry only that it had to end when young third baseman Alex Bregman walked it off with an RBI single in the bottom of the tenth.

Game Four: From lancers to lashers

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

You thought the way Lance McCullers, Jr. and Sonny Gray tangled in American League Championship Series Game Four was something to behold before Aaron Judge wrecked it? You should have seen World Series Game Four with the Astros’ Charlie Morton and the Dodgers’ Alex Wood going at it, before George Springer put paid to it.

Game Three: In living colour on B-R-A-D

The following program was brought to you in living colour on B-R-A-D . . .

The following program was brought to you in living colour on B-R-A-D . . .

For pulling Rich Hill in the fourth in Game Two when Hill clearly lost his stuff, Dave Roberts got roasted because of what happened five innings later. For leaving Yu Darvish in Game Three to get jumped for four in the second on a night Darvish had no stuff to begin with, it wouldn’t be out of line to deep fry him.

Game Two: The nuts hunt the squirrels

Gonzalez runs out the bomb into which he turned Jansen's mistake. Game Two's insanity wasn't even close to finished, though . . .

Gonzalez runs out the bomb into which he turned Jansen’s mistake. Game Two’s insanity wasn’t even close to finished, though . . .

Was the second game of this World Series played in Dodger Stadium—or Bellevue? Were those baseball players we watched—or the inmates becoming the asylum?

World Series heroes past had nothing on Wednesday night’s, and no past Series goat ever got as much time to redeem himself as Wednesday’s, or proclaimed it with such becalmed near-defiance.

Bill Mazeroski, Carlton Fisk, Dave Henderson, Mookie Wilson, Tino Martinez and Derek Jeter, Scott Spiezio and Darin Erstad, Miguel Cabrera, Dave Roberts and David Ortiz, Lance Berkman and David Freese, David Ross and Rajai Davis? Who they?