No apology necessary. Really.

Darvish in front of a TMZ camera---apologising for Game Seven, entirely his own idea. This shouldn't be a trend for sports "goats" . . . should it?

Darvish in front of a TMZ camera—apologising for Game Seven, entirely his own idea. This shouldn’t be a trend for sports “goats” . . . should it?

It’s bad enough that the goat business isn’t really going out of business in sports. Now the goat has to apologise on broadcast camera?

A TMZ reporter caught up with Yu Darvish this weekend. With camera. Asking Darvish how he was feeling, two or three days after the Astros made an inning-and-two-thirds pinata out of him for the second time in two World Series starts.

For Ken Giles, Saturday night was the loneliest night of the week

Astros manager A.J. Hinch (left) gives his battered closer Ken Giles a hand upon lifting him after Cody Bellinger's tiebreaking double Saturday night. Catcher Brian McCann is behind them.

Astros manager A.J. Hinch (left) gives his battered closer Ken Giles a hand upon lifting him after Cody Bellinger’s tiebreaking double Saturday night. Catcher Brian McCann is behind them.

In 1944, Frank Sinatra recorded one of his classic contrast songs, a jaunty swinger with a melancholy lyric. “Saturday night is the loneliest night in the week/I sing the song that I sang for the memories I usually seek,” goes one couplet.

Astros closer Ken Giles might have held onto a couplet like that after Game Four of the World Series.

Game Four: From lancers to lashers

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

You thought the way Lance McCullers, Jr. and Sonny Gray tangled in American League Championship Series Game Four was something to behold before Aaron Judge wrecked it? You should have seen World Series Game Four with the Astros’ Charlie Morton and the Dodgers’ Alex Wood going at it, before George Springer put paid to it.

Belief isn’t enough, except to the Astros

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

For a few moments it looked as though Astros manager A.J. Hinch made a big mistake in the bottom of the fifth in Fenway Park Monday. With one out and one on for the Red Sox, he brought in Justin Verlander, his Game One starter and winner—who’d never thrown an inning of relief in his life until now.

Later, in the bottom of the ninth, it looked like Hinch made a mistake asking closer Ken Giles for a six-out save when Red Sox rookie Rafael Devers stepped up to the plate to lead off.