The Snakes prevail at the circus

Archie Bradley sliding into third with his staggering triple . . .

Archie Bradley sliding into third with his staggering triple . . .

People have said “anything can happen” in the postseason to the point where it sometimes becomes meaningless. Until or unless things happen the way they did in Phoenix Wednesday night.

This is one time when a score such as 11-8 tells you something above and beyond a couple of teams taking it to each other. Baseball above and beyond the call of sanity is one way to put what the Diamondbacks and the Rockies did, even if it’s the Diamondbacks moving on to a division series date with the Dodgers.

Jays could take Rangers badges and minds

Tulowitzki (left) and Bautista bump wrists after crossing the plate on Tulo's bomb . . .

Tulowitzki (left) and Bautista bump wrists after crossing the plate on Tulo’s second-inning bomb . . .

Police brutality—by or against—is a horrible thing. Unless you’re the Toronto Blue Jays against the Texas Rangers in the first two American League division games. The set goes to Toronto with the Rangers very much in danger of losing not only their badges but their minds.

Name one Ranger who expected to get destroyed 15-3 over the course of the two games. Name one who expected Cole Hamels to get billyclubbed for seven runs (six earned) in three and a third in Game One, or possibly still-slightly-ailing Yu Darvish to get bludgeoned for as many home runs as he had strikeouts in Game Two.

Lucroy moves to Texas

After the Indians botched and scotched a deal to land Jonathan Lucroy from the Brewers, the Rangers swept in and bagged the catcher Monday when their deal to land Carlos Beltran from the Yankees had barely sunk in.

With relief pitcher Jeremy Jeffress also going to Texas in the deal, the Rangers sent the Brewers prospects Lewis Brinson (OF) and Luis Ortiz (P), thought to have been two of the Rangers’ top three prospects. A slightly expensive price but one that might help push the Rangers to the postseason in hand with the Beltran deal.

Mets want RISP bump from Bruce; Dodgers rent a pair of A’s

Bruce's RISP production is what the Mets need more of this season . . .

Bruce’s RISP production is what the Mets need more of this season . . .

The whispers, not the shouts, had it that the Mets had eyes for Jay Bruce but weren’t making that big a deal about it. Apparently it was a bigger deal than the whispers had it—on non-waiver deadline day, the Mets—according to sources cited but unnamed by ESPN—landed the Reds’ slugger and the National League’s RBI leader this season in a swap for Dilson Herrera and other prospects.

Deadline lines

The White Sox swear they're not looking to move Sale but in baseball (thanks, Joaquin!) and at trade deadlines there's just one word---you never know.

The White Sox swear they’re not looking to move Sale but in baseball and at trade deadlines there’s just one word—you never know. (Thanks, Joaquin!)

Who’s going? Who’s coming? Who’s buying? Who’s selling? Good questions. A few prospective answers . . .

* SALE OF THE DECADE? Not necessarily having to do with his tailoring misadventures of almost a week and a half ago, Chris Sale continues drawing big enough interest from the Dodgers, the Rangers, and the Red Sox. They have the prospects the White Sox seem most to want in any such deal; it may come to whose prospects entice them most.

Roenicke run, but he wasn’t the Brewers’ problem

The manager usually takes the fall, of course, but Roenicke really took the fall he didn't deserve.

The manager usually takes the fall, of course, but Roenicke really took the fall he didn’t deserve.

The Milwaukee Brewers have thrown out the first manager of the season. And while you expect that when a team starts slowly, you also can’t help wondering how often throwing out the manager is the kind of move made by the general manager who should be measured for execution and just might get it yet.

Ron Roenicke, a graduate of the Mike Scioscia school of coaching, wasn’t the garrulous type fellow alum Joe Maddon is, but he is an acute tactician and handler of players. The problem wasn’t Roenicke’s game thinking or personality balancing, the problem was and is the team he was handed from the outset.