Jim Bunning, RIP: Tenacity

Jim Bunning, pitching his 1964 perfect game against the Mets . . .

Jim Bunning, pitching his 1964 perfect game against the Mets . . .

Jim Bunning, the Hall of Fame righthander who died Friday night of complications from an October 2016 stroke, didn’t mind breaking a few taboos. Whether during a perfect game, helping the hunt for the Major League Baseball Players Association’s first executive director, or driving even his Republican colleagues on Capitol Hill nuts, the freckled Kentuckian feared no hitter, manager, owner, or fellow politician.

Koufax, Drysdale, Roberts, and Miller: The ’66 shots that changed baseball

Koufax (left) and Drysdale, shown in game triumph, yet to triumph in a groundbreaking 1966 contract holdout.

Koufax (left) and Drysdale, shown in game triumph, yet to triumph in a groundbreaking 1966 contract holdout.

Fifty years ago this spring, three Hall of Fame pitchers planted the seeds that would change baseball’s harvest irrevocably, and for the better. One seed kind of opened the door for the other, if indirectly, but once baseball’s field was tilled for the other (kicking and screaming, of course) the game’s and perhaps the country’s worst fears proved largely unfounded.

Post-Perfecto Studs and Duds

Humber.

While glancing around looking for the top WAR men on major league teams, I noticed Philip Humber through this writing has a -0.5 WAR. (He was due to return Tuesday night, after missing a month with an elbow strain.) Obviously, his perfect game in April didn’t exactly do him many favours; in fact, he may be on track to produce the weakest post-perfecto season’s performance among any pitcher who’s thrown a perfect game.