The replay that wasn’t abets the surreality that was

Francisco Lindor celebrates the grand slam he smashed after Yankee skipper Joe Girardi failed to challenge whether Lonnie Chisenhall, hitting ahead of him, really was hit by a pitch to load the pads . . .

Francisco Lindor celebrates the grand slam he smashed after Yankee skipper Joe Girardi failed to challenge whether Lonnie Chisenhall, hitting ahead of him, really was hit by a pitch to load the pads . . .

When the pros and cons of instant replay come under debate, as they still do even after it’s become entrenched, bet on it. Yankee manager Joe Girardi will be questioned for seasons to come over why he didn’t call for one in the bottom of the sixth Friday.

The Indians’ version of Trevor Time

It was Trevor Time in Cleveland Thursday.

It was Trevor Time in Cleveland Thursday.

A pitcher whose thing for drones almost cost the Indians a trip to last year’s World Series. A hitter who sometimes seemed like the unwanted man, the subject of trade rumours almost from the moment the Mets landed him in July 2016, until the Indians agreed to take his full salary on in a waiver-period deal with the Mets in August.

Weren’t Trevor Bauer and Jay Bruce the least likely guys you thought would give the Indians the first big leg up in their American League division series?

The streak is over, but wasn’t that a time?

Mike Minor (right) gets to brag that he finished off the Indians' American League record winning streak.

Mike Minor (right) gets to brag that he finished off the Indians’ American League record winning streak.

All good things must come to their finish, sooner or later. The Indians and their fans would have preferred the streak to finish later, of course, and likewise most of baseball and its lovers. But as the ancient folk song says, “Wasn’t that a time?”

“What they did over there was amazing,” said Royals manager Ned Yost, after his charges hung on for the 4-3 win that put an end to the Indians’ romp. “I mean, it’s utterly amazing. It’s just unfathomable for me that you can go three weeks without losing a game. I mean, it was a tremendous accomplishment.”

For the Indians, it’s blackjack

Ramirez and Lindor are only two Indians with a lot to celebrate as it seems they've forgotten entirely how to lose . . .

Ramirez and Lindor are only two Indians with a lot to celebrate as it seems they’ve forgotten entirely how to lose . . .

Twenty-one means blackjack. Or, the name of the show proving the wick that lit the powder keg of the legendarily notorious quiz show scandal of 1959. In Cleveland, it means American League history. And, for the time being, anyway, invincibility.

Look out, 1935 Chicago Cubs? Step aside, 1916 New York Giants? The Indians aren’t that crazy no matter how invincible they feel after finishing off the teetering Tigers 5-3 Wednesday afternoon. But you wouldn’t blame them for thinking about it, either.

The Mets, from one head down to all heads high

Cabrera (center) is none to thrilled after Ramos bent him with a first pitch over his head; catcher Rupp (29) prepares to keep peace . . .

Cabrera (center) is none to thrilled after Ramos bent him with a first pitch over his head; catcher Rupp (29) prepares to keep peace . . .

If I didn’t know better, I’d swear Edubray Ramos was auditioning for the Texas Rangers to shore up their bullpen. Based on his work in the eighth inning Monday against the Mets, the Phillies righthander seems a good fit for a team sometimes renowned for waiting till next year  and the last minute to settle a grudge.

Mets want RISP bump from Bruce; Dodgers rent a pair of A’s

Bruce's RISP production is what the Mets need more of this season . . .

Bruce’s RISP production is what the Mets need more of this season . . .

The whispers, not the shouts, had it that the Mets had eyes for Jay Bruce but weren’t making that big a deal about it. Apparently it was a bigger deal than the whispers had it—on non-waiver deadline day, the Mets—according to sources cited but unnamed by ESPN—landed the Reds’ slugger and the National League’s RBI leader this season in a swap for Dilson Herrera and other prospects.

Deadline lines

The White Sox swear they're not looking to move Sale but in baseball (thanks, Joaquin!) and at trade deadlines there's just one word---you never know.

The White Sox swear they’re not looking to move Sale but in baseball and at trade deadlines there’s just one word—you never know. (Thanks, Joaquin!)

Who’s going? Who’s coming? Who’s buying? Who’s selling? Good questions. A few prospective answers . . .

* SALE OF THE DECADE? Not necessarily having to do with his tailoring misadventures of almost a week and a half ago, Chris Sale continues drawing big enough interest from the Dodgers, the Rangers, and the Red Sox. They have the prospects the White Sox seem most to want in any such deal; it may come to whose prospects entice them most.

The Giants Throw the Kitchen Sink

Pagan, Sandoval, and Scutaro form the receiving line for Posey who slammed them home . . .

This is going to be a very large and hard pill for Dusty Baker to swallow. It’s bad enough that he couldn’t find a way for his Cincinnati Reds to push the San Francisco Giants down, back, and out of the postseason in this fifth division series game. But he’s entering the history book on the dime of the franchise he once pulled to within five outs of a World Series title a decade ago.