Darvish owns Game Seven, but he wasn’t the only Dodger culprit

The look on Darvish's face after Series MVP Springer took him over the fence said only too much . . .

The look on Darvish’s face after Series MVP Springer’s drive landed over the left center field fence said only too much . . .

Give Yu Darvish credit. He owned this one and didn’t flinch. He went out to start Game Seven of the World Series, got torn apart in an inning and two thirds, and felt even worse for letting down the team he appreciated for giving him another postseason shot in the first place.

Especially because his previous Series start, in Game Three, went the same way, only with one less run against him.

Springing to World Series rings

George Springer (right), celebrating after his two-run homer finished the Astros' scoring for Game Seven . . .

George Springer (right), celebrating after his two-run homer finished the Astros’ scoring for Game Seven . . .

When you’re a 56-year-old baseball team blasted inside out in grief for your hurricane-battered home city, and you feel there’s too little you can do to remove your city’s suffering, there’s really only one thing you can do. You can go out and play baseball and give your city a lift that can’t be paid for.

So we’ll see you for Game Seven . . .

Verlander, undone not by his own pitching but by lack of support while the Dodgers ground two runs out of him and performed escape acts on the field . . .

Verlander, undone not by his own pitching but by lack of support while the Dodgers ground two runs out of him and performed escape acts on the field . . .

The good news: This World Series gets to a Game Seven, after all, for the second straight season and the third in four seasons. Depending on your point of view, the bad news: As this Series has gone, Game Six was just a little too full of something resembling normalcy.

With this Series mostly playing like The Twilight Monty Elsewhere, there was just something wrong with getting a mere Mike & Molly Tuesday night. Game Six was pleasant. Amusing. Sometimes revealing. That about exhausts it.

Game Four: From lancers to lashers

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

You thought the way Lance McCullers, Jr. and Sonny Gray tangled in American League Championship Series Game Four was something to behold before Aaron Judge wrecked it? You should have seen World Series Game Four with the Astros’ Charlie Morton and the Dodgers’ Alex Wood going at it, before George Springer put paid to it.

The ALCS turning out not to be over until it’s over

Springer's rundown and leaping catch of Frazier's drive saved two runs and likely the Astros' season for one more day . . .

Springer’s rundown and leaping catch of Frazier’s drive saved two runs and likely the Astros’ season for one more day . . .

This was the game Justin Verlander lived for from the first time he donned an Astros uniform this year. He’s 3-1 with a 1.49 ERA lifetime in postseason elimination games. He pitched a complete game masterpiece in Game Two of this American League Championship Series.

Belief isn’t enough, except to the Astros

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

For a few moments it looked as though Astros manager A.J. Hinch made a big mistake in the bottom of the fifth in Fenway Park Monday. With one out and one on for the Red Sox, he brought in Justin Verlander, his Game One starter and winner—who’d never thrown an inning of relief in his life until now.

Later, in the bottom of the ninth, it looked like Hinch made a mistake asking closer Ken Giles for a six-out save when Red Sox rookie Rafael Devers stepped up to the plate to lead off.

These days make a fellow proud to be an Astro

Altuve got to abuse one of his favourite patsies over the weekend . . .

Altuve got to abuse one of his favourite patsies over the weekend . . .

How good does it get for the Astros these days? Good enough, apparently, that a slowly swelling cabal of analysts think they—not the Yankees, not the Blue Jays, not the Royals—are the American League’s team to beat. They didn’t say that about the Astros in their best years in the National League.

Now, the Astros are a team that likes to go out on the town
We like to drink and fight and f@ck till curfew comes around
Then it’s time to make the trek
We’d better be back to buddy’s check
It makes a fellow proud to be an Astro.