Closing the (note)book on Rose at last?

Pete Rose, at Great American Ballpark, during ceremonies honouring the 1975-76 Big Red Machine World Series teams: Now he's had the notebook thrown at him.

Pete Rose, at Great American Ballpark, during ceremonies honouring the 1975-76 Big Red Machine World Series teams: Now he’s had the notebook thrown at him.

Really, now, only one thing should shock about the now-firm evidence that Pete Rose bet on baseball while he still played baseball: that anyone should be shocked, when all is said and done. The telltale signs have been there. And, numerous observers are saying (and have said in the past), Rose changes his story almost as often as he once changed his sanitary socks.

Pete Rose applies for reinstatement, and here we go (yet) again

Rose has applied for reinstatment.

Rose has applied for reinstatment.

As of 16 March 2015 the question of whether Pete Rose should or will be reinstated to organised baseball became an official issue one more time. That was the date commissioner Rob Manfred announced he received a formal request for reinstatement from Rose himself. And Manfred was clear enough that nobody—Rose’s sympathisers and opponents included—should read anything deeper into that request or his receipt of it. Yet.

Selig’s legacy, for better and for worse

Selig (right) with 2013 World Series MVP David Ortiz and Ortiz's son, Kaz.

Selig (right) with 2013 World Series MVP David Ortiz.

Bud Selig really is retired, at last. And baseball’s new commissioner, Rob Manfred, isn’t an incumbent or former owner. Selig, you may remember, owned the Milwaukee Brewers when he helped engineer the putsch that sent Fay Vincent out of the commissioner’s office. He then became baseball’s longest serving commissioner since Kenesaw Mountain Landis. And his legacy is at least as mixed as Landis’s was.