Is Derek Jeter fishing for the Marlins?

Jeter, here hitting the home run that became his 3,000th major league hit, has ideas about becoming a baseball owner . . .

Jeter, here hitting the home run that became his 3,000th major league hit, has ideas about becoming a baseball owner . . .

Three decades ago, when Boys of Summer author Roger Kahn bought the minor league Utica Blue Sox, one of the first people he told was “my cherished Brooklyn Dodgers friend” Carl Furillo. “You? An owner?” Furillo replied in amazement. “You’ll be lucky if you don’t have two ulcers by Opening Day.”

Kahn sold the team after a year. But he was (and is) a writer. Players turning owners is almost as rare. The latest possibility may be Derek Jeter, who’s reported to be interested in becoming a major player in any push to buy the Miami Marlins.

Of Cardinal sinners and Royal stuffers

Is hacking for the Redbirds?

Is hacking for the (Red)birds?

Boys will be boys, in baseball and elsewhere, and grown men will be boys, too. But some of what the Show Me State’s boys and girls seem to be showing don’t seem to be the kind of thing you’d like showing.

If the St. Louis Cardinals’ front office isn’t facing an investigation into whether people therein hacked into the Houston Astros’ internal data networks, Kansas City fans are gleefully stuffing online All-Star ballot boxes in favour of the Royals regardless of whether the players in question deserve to be in the starting lineup.

Jeter, overmatched but not outclassed

Jeter had a few pre-game chuckles with a few Orioles before Tuesday's game, but the way the game ended was anything but a smiling matter.

Jeter had a few pre-game chuckles with a few Orioles before Tuesday’s game, but the way the game ended was anything but a smiling matter.

In microcosm, Derek Jeter’s final at-bat Tuesday night slammed home both the point of what he’s no longer able to do and that the Yankees can’t afford even a single loss in their final five games if they want to get to the postseason even through the back door. For in a moment that once might have meant a final bell miracle, Jeter was hopelessly, almost embarrassingly overmatched.

Brien’s Song

Brien Taylor, young and a Yankee howitzer in waiting . . .

Brien Taylor, young and a Yankee howitzer in waiting . . .

“[H]ere I was, eleven picks [later], able to get my time in the big leagues,” wrote Doug Glanville, outfielder turned baseball writer (and a fine one), in The New York Times two years ago, remembering his draft (first round, 1991, to the Cubs) and the number one overall pick therein. “I made my major league debut, earned a multiyear deal, had a locker next to Alex Rodriguez’s. [Glanville played for the Rangers for part of 2003.] I try to tell myself that it was because of my better judgment about what risks to take, or my Ivy League opportunities, but comfort does not come. For me, reading about Brien Taylor is haunting.”

A-Rod Agonistes, the final chapter?

The stain on his uniform may be nothing compared to the stain on him, his team, and his game . . .

The stain on his uniform may be nothing compared to the stain on him, his team, and his game . . .

We could see a 2014 baseball season and maybe more without Alex Rodriguez, after all. The original 211-game suspension didn’t hold up, but on Saturday independent arbitrator Fredric Horowitz imposed a ban of 162 games plus any postseason competition into which the Yankees enter. As no few observers have noted already, that’ll be an easier jump to justify than a 211-game jump, the thinking being that losing a season is more defensible on appeal than losing an unprecedented season and a third.

Jeter opts in, Red Sox make qualifiers, and other stove bolts . . .

Derek Jeter will earn $2.5 million more than the 2014 player option he could have picked up would have paid him. ESPN’s Andrew Marchand reports the Yankees have signed Jeter to a one-year, $12 million deal for 2014.

The Captain returns . . .

The Captain returns . . .

A source with knowledge of the negotiations told ESPN New York that the talks were largely held between Jeter and team owner Hal Steinbrenner, who both live in Tampa. Jeter’s agent, Casey Close, handled the details of the contract.

The Mariano, once more around the home park

The Mariano says goodbye to Yankee Stadium . . .

The Mariano says goodbye to Yankee Stadium . . .

The game meant nothing to the Yankees otherwise. They staggered out of the postseason picture one day earlier. These mostly old and mostly battered Yankees had nothing but will to get them far enough that they held onto postseason hopes by a frayed thread at best. Behind 4-0 to the Rays Thursday night in Yankee Stadium, a deficit that would hold up, there was only one reason for manager Joe Girardi to bring in his closer at all, never mind in the top of the eight.

Godzilla goes home a Yankee

Sometimes the gesture seems futile, sometimes not. The least the Yankees could have done for one of their best-liked and most productive players was to sign him for a day and let him retire as a ‘Striper. Which is exactly what they did with Hideki Matsui Saturday—on a day his old teammate and friend Derek Jeter returned from the disabled list with a Matsui-like bang, hitting the first major league pitch he’s seen all season over the right field fence.

Matsui (left) with Jeter, going home a Yankee . . .

Matsui (left) with Jeter, going home a Yankee . . .

Amidst Boschgate, Prince Hal Gives Yankees a Reality Check

Steinbrenner isn't exactly the King of Hearts. (Yes, that's Whitey Ford to his left . . .)

Steinbrenner isn’t exactly the King of Hearts. (Yes, that’s Whitey Ford to his left . . .)

As the latest contretemps involving Alex Rodriguez continues winding (or unwinding, as the case may well be) toward somewhere, Hal Steinbrenner, perhaps inadvertently, allowed to slip a hint that maybe, just maybe, the Yankees are learning in in-house cultural terms to deal with baseball’s, and any sport’s, least repealable law.

The Empire Emeritus and its managing general partner may pledge to cooperate with baseball government’s probe into Boschgate (“But other than that, there’s not much to say”), and they may be pondering ways to divest themselves of Rodriguez’s presence and its baggage, actual or alleged. But they may also be learning the hard way the lesson Steinbrenner’s larger-than-life father didn’t always seem have known.

A-Rod Does the Shaky Shaky Hip, Again

Another shaky shaky hip has bitten into A-Rod . . .

Now we know: Alex Rodriguez played the postseason on a bum hip. From the winter meetings comes the word that A-Rod incurred a torn labrum in his left hip somewhere near regular season’s end, perhaps, or possibly very early in the postseason.

He faces a four-to-six-week pre-rehabilitation before undergoing surgery to repair the labrum. He isn’t expected to return to the Yankee lineup until some time in June, if that soon. And, it also turns out that Rodriguez complained about some hip discomfort on the night Raul Ibanez first pinch hit for him and swung his own way into postseason legend and lore.