On the Royal stuffing, continued . . .

Lorenzo Cain (left), a Royal who does belong as an All-Star starter, with Omar Infante, who doesn't---but might, with five more Royals thanks to apparent ballot box stuffing.

Lorenzo Cain (left), a Royal who does belong as an All-Star starter, with Omar Infante, who doesn’t—but might, with five more Royals thanks to apparent ballot box stuffing.

“We’ll see how it all turns out,” says baseball commissioner Rob Manfred about the All-Star voting that still has eight Kansas City Royals—only one of whom actually does deserve the honour—going to the American League’s starting lineup by dint of the fan voting. “We are responsive and open to change if we get a result that is not consistent with the goals of the system that is in place.”

Pete Rose applies for reinstatement, and here we go (yet) again

Rose has applied for reinstatment.

Rose has applied for reinstatment.

As of 16 March 2015 the question of whether Pete Rose should or will be reinstated to organised baseball became an official issue one more time. That was the date commissioner Rob Manfred announced he received a formal request for reinstatement from Rose himself. And Manfred was clear enough that nobody—Rose’s sympathisers and opponents included—should read anything deeper into that request or his receipt of it. Yet.

Selig’s legacy, for better and for worse

Selig (right) with 2013 World Series MVP David Ortiz and Ortiz's son, Kaz.

Selig (right) with 2013 World Series MVP David Ortiz.

Bud Selig really is retired, at last. And baseball’s new commissioner, Rob Manfred, isn’t an incumbent or former owner. Selig, you may remember, owned the Milwaukee Brewers when he helped engineer the putsch that sent Fay Vincent out of the commissioner’s office. He then became baseball’s longest serving commissioner since Kenesaw Mountain Landis. And his legacy is at least as mixed as Landis’s was.