Otani says an enthusiastic hello to the “Angels family”

Shohei Otani greets a small throng outside Angel Stadium Saturday . . .

Shohei Otani greets a small throng outside Angel Stadium Saturday . . .

It may have been as simple as one thing. Of all the major league teams with which he dealt, Shohei Otani felt the closest bond-in-the-making with the Angels.

“While there has been much speculation about what would drive Shohei’s decision, what mattered to him most wasn’t market size, time zone, or league but that he felt a true bond with the Angels,” his agent Nez Balelo said in a formal statement. “He sees this as the best environment to develop and reach the next level and attain his career goals. More than ever, I believe this is not only a special talent but a man of special character, and like everyone else I’m excited to see him in major league baseball.”

The Royals sweep the Angels with more than mini-ball

One down, the Orioles to go . . .

One down, the Orioles to go . . .

Forget the payrolls, as Kansas City outfielder Jarrod Dyson rightly points out. They don’t matter when you hit the field or step into the batter’s box. The wealthiest teams in baseball have been known to collapse like insolvent counties.

The Los Angeles Angels joined their ranks ignominiously Sunday thanks to a Royals team that seems to know nothing of the meaning of rolling over and playing dead. And these Angels, who’d run roughshod after the All-Star break and turned into a threshing machine while all around what remained of the American League West deflated, looked and played like zombies in a division series game they had to win just to stay alive.