Brien’s Song

Brien Taylor, young and a Yankee howitzer in waiting . . .

Brien Taylor, young and a Yankee howitzer in waiting . . .

“[H]ere I was, eleven picks [later], able to get my time in the big leagues,” wrote Doug Glanville, outfielder turned baseball writer (and a fine one), in The New York Times two years ago, remembering his draft (first round, 1991, to the Cubs) and the number one overall pick therein. “I made my major league debut, earned a multiyear deal, had a locker next to Alex Rodriguez’s. [Glanville played for the Rangers for part of 2003.] I try to tell myself that it was because of my better judgment about what risks to take, or my Ivy League opportunities, but comfort does not come. For me, reading about Brien Taylor is haunting.”

Brains, Bounty, and Busts . . .

All we know is what we still don't know . . .

* BRAINS VERSUS BRAUN? No, Ryan Braun (or, at least, his attorney) certainly didn’t help his own cause by trying to throw sample collector Dino Laurenzi, Jr. under the proverbial bus. Yes, Braun has every right to defend his integrity, even if it’s going to take awhile to sort out just what did or didn’t transpire, or who is or isn’t cleared. No, baseball government didn’t do itself any major favours by slamming arbitrator Shayam Das’s overthrow of Braun’s likely suspension. And, yes, Hall of Fame writer Murray Chass is dead right in chastising the bulk of the sports media who all but beat the tympani for the “guilty until proven one way or the other” school of thought on actual or alleged performance-enhancing substances yet lingering in baseball. All of which means that the only thing we still seem to know is that we don’t know much of anything just yet. Which isn’t going to stop those who don’t know from preening as though they know, anyway.