Basebrawl Comerica: The umps got some splainin’ to do

Gary Sanchez---second from left, who'd taken one on the hip an inning after he homered yet again against the Tigers---is restrained by teammate Clint Frazier after Miguel Cabrera and Austin Romine's skirmish opens the first of three bench-clearing brawls Thursday afternoon.

Gary Sanchez—second from left, who’d taken one on the hip an inning after he homered yet again against the Tigers—is restrained by teammate Clint Frazier after Miguel Cabrera and Austin Romine’s skirmish opens the first of three bench-clearing brawls Thursday afternoon.

If baseball government intends to investigate the Thursday afternoon riots on the Comerica Park field in Detroit, they should begin by calling home plate umpire Carlos Torres to account and asking him one question. The question is, “What on earth were you not thinking when Michael Fulmer drilled Gary Sanchez in the top of the fifth?”

HOF ballot newcomers: Should he, shouldn’t he?

That’s the problem with Hall of Fame ballots. Other than the obvious there-because-it’s-five-years-retired players, picking the worthies from among the newcomers is both a challenge and a lot of fun, at least until you run into the ones you knew were good, even great, but not quite Hall of Fame great.

And several of these players have had some impeccable moments regardless of whether or not they shake out as Hall of Famers:

 

THE NEWCOMERS, CONTINUED . . .

Anderson hits the three-run double that really puts the Angels en route to winning Game Seven, 2002 World Series.

Anderson hits the three-run double that really puts the Angels en route to winning Game Seven, 2002 World Series.

Bombs, schmombs, these Orioles can be road runners, too

De Aza sliding across the plate in the eighth as a slightly stunned Miguel Cabrera (24) looks homeward.

De Aza sliding across the plate in the eighth as a slightly stunned Miguel Cabrera (24) looks homeward.

The one thing Detroit Tigers fans probably fear more than anything else happened Thursday night. The Baltimore Orioles got into the Tigers’ bullpen at all, never mind while holding a one-run lead.

The one thing Orioles fans knew above all else going in was that their power game was probably their most obvious asset, assuming they didn’t run into pitchers who could tie them up. Who knew the Orioles could perform any impression of the Kansas City Royals, never mind the one they performed in the bottom of the eighth, after homering their way for the most part to that one-run lead?