Kershaw to Astros: Sorry, wrong number

Clayton Kershaw dropping the hammer on the Astros. Look, Ma---no seventh-inning disaster!

Clayton Kershaw dropping the hammer on the Astros. Look, Ma—no seventh-inning disaster!

If you’re looking for perspective with the World Series underway, you could always begin with this. No pitcher struck out as many as eleven Astros in a game on the regular season. Until they ran into Clayton Kershaw in Game One.

For that matter, no pitcher in Dodger silks had struck out ten or more in any World Series game since Game Seven of the 1965 World Series—a fellow named Sandy Koufax, who struck out fifteen Twins that day—until Kershaw punched out his eleven Tuesday night. 

Belief isn’t enough, except to the Astros

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

The Astros celebrate after putting the Red Sox to bed for the season Monday . . .

For a few moments it looked as though Astros manager A.J. Hinch made a big mistake in the bottom of the fifth in Fenway Park Monday. With one out and one on for the Red Sox, he brought in Justin Verlander, his Game One starter and winner—who’d never thrown an inning of relief in his life until now.

Later, in the bottom of the ninth, it looked like Hinch made a mistake asking closer Ken Giles for a six-out save when Red Sox rookie Rafael Devers stepped up to the plate to lead off.

Boston believes, for now

Ramirez hoisted a call to arms, then backed it up going 4-for-4 on behalf of his Red Sox mates throttling the Astros in Game Three . . .

Ramirez hoisted a call to arms, then backed it up going 4-for-4 on behalf of his Red Sox mates throttling the Astros in Game Three . . .

It was as if the Red Sox called a conference before Game Three at Fenway Park and said, If you don’t mind, we’ll decide if and when we’re dead and buried. Designated hitter Hanley Ramirez’s exclamation point was the “Believe in Boston” sign he carried out during pre-game lineup introductions.