Monty Python’s Flying Series

Alex Bregman (lower left), mobbed after walking it off . . .

Alex Bregman (lower left), mobbed after walking it off . . .

Forget any previous comparisons to The Twilight Zone, The Outer Limits, and St. Elsewhere. This is Monty Python’s Flying Series. On Sunday night it was as though the Dodgers and Astros agreed before the first pitch, “And now, for something completely different . . . ” As if this World Series wasn’t, already.

This Game Five may not be the greatest World Series game ever played, but it was for damn sure the most entertaining. So much so that you might even find Astro fans who were sorry only that it had to end when young third baseman Alex Bregman walked it off with an RBI single in the bottom of the tenth.

For Ken Giles, Saturday night was the loneliest night of the week

Astros manager A.J. Hinch (left) gives his battered closer Ken Giles a hand upon lifting him after Cody Bellinger's tiebreaking double Saturday night. Catcher Brian McCann is behind them.

Astros manager A.J. Hinch (left) gives his battered closer Ken Giles a hand upon lifting him after Cody Bellinger’s tiebreaking double Saturday night. Catcher Brian McCann is behind them.

In 1944, Frank Sinatra recorded one of his classic contrast songs, a jaunty swinger with a melancholy lyric. “Saturday night is the loneliest night in the week/I sing the song that I sang for the memories I usually seek,” goes one couplet.

Astros closer Ken Giles might have held onto a couplet like that after Game Four of the World Series.

Game Four: From lancers to lashers

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

Wood, who went where no Dodger pitcher has gone in a World Series game before Springer sprung . . .

You thought the way Lance McCullers, Jr. and Sonny Gray tangled in American League Championship Series Game Four was something to behold before Aaron Judge wrecked it? You should have seen World Series Game Four with the Astros’ Charlie Morton and the Dodgers’ Alex Wood going at it, before George Springer put paid to it.

Game Three: In living colour on B-R-A-D

The following program was brought to you in living colour on B-R-A-D . . .

The following program was brought to you in living colour on B-R-A-D . . .

For pulling Rich Hill in the fourth in Game Two when Hill clearly lost his stuff, Dave Roberts got roasted because of what happened five innings later. For leaving Yu Darvish in Game Three to get jumped for four in the second on a night Darvish had no stuff to begin with, it wouldn’t be out of line to deep fry him.

Game Two: The nuts hunt the squirrels

Gonzalez runs out the bomb into which he turned Jansen's mistake. Game Two's insanity wasn't even close to finished, though . . .

Gonzalez runs out the bomb into which he turned Jansen’s mistake. Game Two’s insanity wasn’t even close to finished, though . . .

Was the second game of this World Series played in Dodger Stadium—or Bellevue? Were those baseball players we watched—or the inmates becoming the asylum?

World Series heroes past had nothing on Wednesday night’s, and no past Series goat ever got as much time to redeem himself as Wednesday’s, or proclaimed it with such becalmed near-defiance.

Bill Mazeroski, Carlton Fisk, Dave Henderson, Mookie Wilson, Tino Martinez and Derek Jeter, Scott Spiezio and Darin Erstad, Miguel Cabrera, Dave Roberts and David Ortiz, Lance Berkman and David Freese, David Ross and Rajai Davis? Who they?

The Mets take a Mickey and he knocks them out

Callaway takes in Citi Field, where he got a personal welcome from the Mets as their new manager Monday.

Callaway takes in Citi Field, where he got a personal welcome from the Mets as their new manager Monday.

When the Yankees shoved the Indians out of this postseason, Indians manager Terry Francona predicted his pitching coach, Mickey Callaway, might find work as another team’s manager if he had a mind to do so. Francona should be playing the stock market. Callaway has done just that, with the Mets hiring him to succeed Terry Collins.

Kershaw to Astros: Sorry, wrong number

Clayton Kershaw dropping the hammer on the Astros. Look, Ma---no seventh-inning disaster!

Clayton Kershaw dropping the hammer on the Astros. Look, Ma—no seventh-inning disaster!

If you’re looking for perspective with the World Series underway, you could always begin with this. No pitcher struck out as many as eleven Astros in a game on the regular season. Until they ran into Clayton Kershaw in Game One.

For that matter, no pitcher in Dodger silks had struck out ten or more in any World Series game since Game Seven of the 1965 World Series—a fellow named Sandy Koufax, who struck out fifteen Twins that day—until Kershaw punched out his eleven Tuesday night. 

Josh Reddick thinks Dodger fans done him wrong

COnfucius say: "Take champagne bath in skivvies, beware foaming at mouth."

Confucius say: “Take champagne bath in skivvies, beware foaming at mouth.”

There are some things about which baseball players ought not to pop off, when it comes to their former clubs, especially when they’re about to face said clubs in a World Series. Things like .220/.273/.300 slash lines against their former teams. Things like their .258/.307/.335 slash lines when playing for said former teams, not to mention their measly two home runs and nine runs batted in.

If you can’t beat him, hire him

The Astros' bench coach will manage the Red Sox in 2018. First, though, there's a World Series to win . . .

The Astros’ bench coach will manage the Red Sox in 2018. First, though, there’s a World Series to win . . .

If Alex Cora ever needs to remind himself about determination, he has only to look at an at-bat he had as a Dodger against the Cubs 12 May 2004. On that date, at 9:23 Pacific time, in that at-bat, he graduated from utilityman to mini-legend.

With Matt Clement on the mound, Cora looked at ball one up and away. Then it went: called strike. Ball two. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Foul. Two-run homer.

Houston, you have no problem going to the World Series

Astros fans told the story almost as well as the Astros did in Game Seven . . .

Astros fans told the story almost as well as the Astros did in Game Seven . . .

Jose Altuve said after Game Six that he expected both the Astros and the Yankees would leave everything on the field in Game Seven of the American League Championship Series. He may have been too polite to say that, except for one Game Six burst, the Yankees may have left everything behind in New York.