Doug Harvey, RIP: Timing

Doug Harvey (left) handing Roberto Clemente the ball Clemente hit for his final major league hit---number 3,000, in 1972.

Doug Harvey (left) handing Roberto Clemente the ball Clemente hit for his final major league hit—number 3,000, in 1972.

Doug Harvey, who died Saturday at 87, was a conscientious umpire who insisted on getting the calls right, not fast. He helped usher in the end of umpires anticipating calls after an incident in his rookie National League season, 1962, with Stan Musial at the plate and two outs.

Harvey called strike three on a pitch that looked like it would cross the plate but in fact broke wide of it. Musial didn’t flinch. He called for his glove from a Cardinals’ bat boy and, without turning around, chided Harvey, “Young fellow, I don’t know what league you came from, but we use the same plate. It’s seventeen inches wide.”

Al Luplow, RIP: Catch as catch can

Luplow holding aloft the ball he caught with a flying leap over the Fenway Park right center field fence in 1963.

Luplow holding aloft the ball he caught with a flying leap over the Fenway Park right center field fence in 1963.

Al Luplow spent only two out of seven major league seasons as a regular player, with the 1964 Indians and the 1966 Mets. But the greatest moment of his career was a) when he was a non-regular; and, b) when a mere 6,000+ fans sait in Fenway Park to see it happen.

Concussion-compromised Justin Morneau retires

From All-Star to pleasant memory thanks to a concussion or two, Morneau now works in the Twins' front office . . .

From All-Star to pleasant memory thanks to a concussion or two, Morneau now works in the Twins’ front office . . .

Add Justin Morneau to the list of baseball players whose careers have been compromised and then brought to a close due to concussions and their after-effects. The longtime Twins first baseman who made subsequent stops in Pittsburgh, Chicago, and Colorado has retired to take a gig in the Twins’ front office, as a special assistant.