Stanton’s wrist and other sorrows, from discharged managers especially . . .

Stanton doubles over in pain as his hamate surrenders.

Stanton doubles over in pain as his hamate surrenders.

One minute Giancarlo Stanton managed to get back ahead of Nori Aoki in the National League All-Star voting. The next, he was gone, for four to six weeks and maybe more, thanks to a hamate bone fracture in his left hand. This is just what the Marlins don’t need in a year in which they were trying to build on 2014′s fifteen-game improvement.

Essentially, Sandberg fires the Phillies

Sandberg steps from the podium after his abrupt "resignation" . . .

Sandberg steps from the podium after his abrupt “resignation” . . .

When Whitey Herzog resigned as the Cardinals’ manager in July 1990, there were those who said what he really did was upend the usual saying (you can’t can the whole team, so you can the manager) and fire his team. “Herzog had only four rules,” wrote Thomas Boswell. “Be on time. Bust your butt. Play smart. And have some laughs while you’re at it. The Cardinals broke the rules. So Whitey canned ‘em.”

Closing the (note)book on Rose at last?

Pete Rose, at Great American Ballpark, during ceremonies honouring the 1975-76 Big Red Machine World Series teams: Now he's had the notebook thrown at him.

Pete Rose, at Great American Ballpark, during ceremonies honouring the 1975-76 Big Red Machine World Series teams: Now he’s had the notebook thrown at him.

Really, now, only one thing should shock about the now-firm evidence that Pete Rose bet on baseball while he still played baseball: that anyone should be shocked, when all is said and done. The telltale signs have been there. And, numerous observers are saying (and have said in the past), Rose changes his story almost as often as he once changed his sanitary socks.

The All-Star fan vote’s broken; here’s one way to fix (ahem,—repair!) it

Kipnis, the AL's leading WARrior at second base through Friday . . .

Kipnis, the AL’s leading WARrior at second base through Friday . . .

I didn’t cast my own All-Star vote until this past Thursday, but I’d like to think that I applied a little more intelligence and a lot less up yours to the exercise than seems to have been applied by those determined to stuff the American League’s starting lineup with Kansas City Royals whether or not said Royals (I’ll get to that shortly) actually deserve starting berths.

On the Royal stuffing, continued . . .

Lorenzo Cain (left), a Royal who does belong as an All-Star starter, with Omar Infante, who doesn't---but might, with five more Royals thanks to apparent ballot box stuffing.

Lorenzo Cain (left), a Royal who does belong as an All-Star starter, with Omar Infante, who doesn’t—but might, with five more Royals thanks to apparent ballot box stuffing.

“We’ll see how it all turns out,” says baseball commissioner Rob Manfred about the All-Star voting that still has eight Kansas City Royals—only one of whom actually does deserve the honour—going to the American League’s starting lineup by dint of the fan voting. “We are responsive and open to change if we get a result that is not consistent with the goals of the system that is in place.”

Of Cardinal sinners and Royal stuffers

Is hacking for the Redbirds?

Is hacking for the (Red)birds?

Boys will be boys, in baseball and elsewhere, and grown men will be boys, too. But some of what the Show Me State’s boys and girls seem to be showing don’t seem to be the kind of thing you’d like showing.

If the St. Louis Cardinals’ front office isn’t facing an investigation into whether people therein hacked into the Houston Astros’ internal data networks, Kansas City fans are gleefully stuffing online All-Star ballot boxes in favour of the Royals regardless of whether the players in question deserve to be in the starting lineup.

The Mariners play a Trumbo card that might be a joker

Could Trumbo and the Mariners hurt each other more than help each other?

Could Trumbo and the Mariners hurt each other more than help each other?

Things got this bad for the Mariners by midweek: They were hitting .239 and slugging .393 as a team. Nelson Cruz may be having a stellar season thus far but he’s the only Mariner regular with an on base percentage reaching toward .400. In fact, he looks more like Robinson Cano, their big free agency signing of over a year ago, than Robinson Cano does these days.