What’s the deal otherwise? Stephen Drew, among others . . .

Drew hits one out in Game Six, 2013 World Series . . .

Drew hits one into the bullpen in Game Six, 2013 World Series . . .

Stephen Drew rolled the market dice last winter and came up empty. He finally signed a one-year deal with the Red Sox, for whom he played in last year’s World Series, in June. Now he’s going to be a Yankee.

The Red Sox, continuing their apparent great fire sale, sent Drew to the Empire Emeritus for third baseman Kelly Johnson before the non-waiver trade deadline Thursday.

The Rays get off the pot and trade Price

Price pitching in last October's division series . . . going to the Tigers.

Price pitching in last October’s division series . . . going to the Tigers.

David Price’s immediate tweet was probably more gracious than the Rays deserved: “wow…what a day!! Rays fans THANK YOU!! Great Chapter of my life just ended…ready to start a new one with the Tigers!! Thanks again.” The number one subject of non-waiver trade deadline rumours for two seasons, and of off-season trade rumours, finally got dealt. To the Tigers. In a three-way. At damn near the next-to-last-minute for non-waiver trading today.

The Red Sox drop the big trade bombs . . .

Lester winning Game Five of last year's World Series---heading for a race in Oakland.

Lester winning Game Five of last year’s World Series—heading for a race in Oakland.

If you could go to the Hall of Fame based on grace when being traded, Jonny Gomes would probably be a first-ballot candidate. The grinding outfielder whom the Red Sox signed on the cheap for 2013 and had no small hand in their staggering worst-to-World Series triumph last year showed nothing but appreciation for the club that just packaged him with Jon Lester to the Athletics for Yoenis Cespedes.

Colby vs. Colby: The shift that keeps on giving?

Lewis, who thinks Rasmus wasn't very polite to bunt for a base hit opposite a defensive shift . . .

Lewis, who thinks Rasmus wasn’t very polite to bunt for a base hit opposite a defensive shift . . .

A 6.54 earned run average can give a pitcher strange and unusual thoughts in an attempt to reduce it. Until Colby Lewis on Saturday, I never knew it could give a pitcher ideas about rewriting the so-called unwritten rules to the point where it’s not kosher for an opposing hitter to think about getting himself on base by way of the gift your own team is handing him on a plate.

The Angels walk a new Street

Street's getting his halo on . . .

Street’s getting his halo on . . .

This one could hurt the Oakland Athletics in more ways than one. The Los Angeles Angels aren’t foolish enough to crow, “Gentlemen, we have just traded for the pennant,” but they’re not foolish enough to think Huston Street isn’t going to be a small accessory in psychological as well as baseball warfare, as they approach the stretch drive as more than a tiny spot in the Athletics’ rear view mirror.

Groovin’

Jeter gets his groove on?

Jeter gets his groove on?

“Democracy,” H.L. Mencken postulated famously (or infamously, depending upon your point of view), “[is] that form of government whereby the common people know what they want and deserve to get it, good and hard.” Tuesday night’s All-Star Game could be considered evidence that common and uncommon people alike knew what they wanted and got what they deserved, good and hard.

Let’s Not Put the A’s into the Series Just Yet, Folks . . .

Samardzija to the A's, who may or may not have traded for the World Series . . .

Samardzija to the A’s, who may or may not have traded for the World Series . . .

Eons ago, an anonymous Brooklyn Dodgers executive crowed when the club dealt for Chicago Cubs outfielder Andy Pafko, in June 1951, “Gentlemen, we have just traded for the pennant.” Pafko would provide the Dodgers some much-needed additional pop with 35 runs batted in and eighteen home runs in 84 games, in a season in which he was 3.2 wins above a replacement-level player overall.

Jim Brosnan, RIP: Inside Looking Out

Jim Brosnan, with the Cardinals.

Jim Brosnan, with the Cardinals.

“A cocky book, caustic and candid and, in a way, courageous,” began Red Smith’s review of The Long Season, relief pitcher Jim Brosnan’s record of his 1959 season, spent between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Cincinnati Reds, “for Brosnan calls them as he sees them, doesn’t hesitate to name names, and employs ridicule like a stiletto. He infuriated a lot of men in baseball, but he wrote an honest book that furnished an insight into the ballplayer’s life which no outsider could possibly get.”