Making sense of the Peralta deal

From Biogenesis to big deal . . .

From Biogenesis to big deal . . .

So what to make of the Jhonny Peralta signing with the St. Louis Cardinals, in the wake of his having been one of the Biogenesis 13? Among other things:

1) A four year deal at $52 million dollars isn’t exactly what anyone expected to see for a player bagged over actual or alleged performance-enhancing substances. Without that issue, however, it’s a questionable deal considering Peralta’s age (32), his faltering defensive range, and his batting average-dependent on-base percentage.

The Angels play for a Freese-in

Swinging for immortality in the 2011 Series, Freese (23) will now try swinging for the Angels . . .

Swinging for immortality in the 2011 Series, Freese (23) will now try swinging for the Angels . . .

Two years ago, David Freese owned his hometown St. Louis. His National League Championship Series and World Series surrealistics all but ensured the late-blooming infielder that he’d never have to pay for his own steaks in St. Louis again.

A month ago, alas, it became apparent that, following a compromised 2013 and a mostly futile postseason, he would get the Freese-out at third base, now that Kolten Wong—Game Four of the World Series to one side—had arrived in earnest to play second base and Matt Carpenter could be returned to the third base aviary the Cardinals have always seen him as capable of holding.

The Rangers’ Prince has come

Texas bound . . .

Texas bound . . .

One presumes that, for every observer who thought the Tigers would be stuck with Prince Fielder on the rest of that contract following his postseason disappearance, there was an observer pondering whether it was when, not if the Tigers would find a way to part with him.

The sixth inning of American League Championship Series Game Six said more than the Tigers or their fans wanted to know. There was Fielder on third—with Jhonny Peralta at the plate and grounding one up to Red Sox second baseman Dustin Peralta, who slapped a tag on Victor Martinez and whipped a throw home—getting caught in a rundown that ended only when Fielder belly-flopped like a whale falling from a boat as Red Sox catcher Jarrod Saltalamacchia tagged him out.

Michael Weiner, RIP: It took a fan to transform the players’ union

Michael Weiner---only his body was weakened by brain cancer---watching All-Star batting practise at Citi Field in July. (Photo: USA Today.)

Michael Weiner—only his body was weakened by brain cancer—watching All-Star batting practise at Citi Field in July. (Photo: USA Today.)

The Baseball Writers Association of America held a meeting during the All-Star Game break in New York. Major League Baseball Players Association executive director Michael Weiner, who enjoyed a solid relationship with the group, was an obvious target for questions. Weiner couldn’t resist opening by asking, “Any questions not related to Biogenesis or brain cancer?”

Let there be replay, at long enough last

This man on the left doesn't hold with replay . . .

This man on the left doesn’t hold with replay . . .

“I’m for the game the way it is,” Tommy Lasorda said, emphasis on is. “It’s been like that for years. And I think it should stay that way.” Lasorda was one of several Hall of Famers discussing instant replay, which the owners have now voted to go forward with a major expansion of using instant replay in 2014.

A better man than pitcher says goodbye to Giants fans with class

Barry Zito with his wife, Amber, as the Giants celebrated winning the 2012 pennant.

Barry Zito with his wife, Amber, as the Giants celebrated winning the 2012 pennant. Over a year later, he says goodbye with class.

You’ve heard often enough about professional athletes who learn to say hello when it’s time to say goodbye. But you rarely hear about those who know how to say goodbye when a fan base isn’t sure whether to laugh at him or demand refunds. Meet Barry Zito, whose 2014 option the San Francisco Giants, to nobody’s surprise, declined, in favour of a $7 million buyout.

Jeter opts in, Red Sox make qualifiers, and other stove bolts . . .

Derek Jeter will earn $2.5 million more than the 2014 player option he could have picked up would have paid him. ESPN’s Andrew Marchand reports the Yankees have signed Jeter to a one-year, $12 million deal for 2014.

The Captain returns . . .

The Captain returns . . .

A source with knowledge of the negotiations told ESPN New York that the talks were largely held between Jeter and team owner Hal Steinbrenner, who both live in Tampa. Jeter’s agent, Casey Close, handled the details of the contract.